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Finjan Club
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Album: Finjan Club
# Song Title   Time
1)    Death of Emmett Till
2)    Stealin'
3)    Hiram Hubbard
4)    Blowin' in the Wind
5)    Rocks and Gravel
6)    Quit Your Lowdown Ways
7)    He Was a Friend of Mine
8)    Let Me Die in My Footsteps
9)    Two Trains Runnin'
10)    Ramblin' on My Mind
11)    Muleskinner Blues (Blue Yodel #8)
 

Album: Finjan Club
# Song Title   Time
1)    Death of Emmett Till
2)    Stealin'
3)    Hiram Hubbard
4)    Blowin' in the Wind
5)    Rocks and Gravel
6)    Quit Your Lowdown Ways
7)    He Was a Friend of Mine
8)    Let Me Die in My Footsteps
9)    Two Trains Runnin'
10)    Ramblin' on My Mind
11)    Muleskinner Blues (Blue Yodel #8)
 
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Performer Notes
  • There are a number of live Bob Dylan recordings from 1962, and now that some of them have been officially issued (particularly on Live at the Gaslight 1962), this July 2, 1962 Montreal performance might not be considered the first place to look for such material. But if you do have a deep interest in Dylan, and particularly the Dylan of this era, this is recommended further listening. The sound quality is pretty clear, and almost up to the level you'd want from an official release. The 11-song set includes a few Dylan originals, among them such relatively little-traveled ones as "The Death of Emmett Till," "Quit Your Lowdown Ways," and "Let Me Die in My Footsteps," as well as an early performance of "Blowin' in the Wind" (here memorably introduced as a kind of song that says "a little more than I love you and you love me, and let's go over to the banks of Italy and raise a happy family, you for me and me for you"). While there are other versions of some of the traditional folk and blues tunes on other Dylan bootlegs, "Rocks and Gravel," "Stealin'," Muddy Waters' "Two Trains Runnin'" (mistakenly listed on some bootlegs as a Dylan composition called "Still a Fool"), Robert Johnson's "Ramblin' on My Mind," "Hiram Hubbard," and "Muleskinner Blues" (albeit a chaotic version where he stops, starts, and changes keys several times) are likewise not exactly among the more familiar items in Dylan's early repertoire, and interesting to hear in part for that reason alone. The main reason to listen to this CD, however, is the performance itself, in which Dylan sings and plays with commanding passion and sensitivity, at a time when he was both finding his feet as a composer and still maintaining deep roots in traditional folk music. ~ Richie Unterberger
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