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The Domestication and Exploitation of Plants and Animals
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The domestication of plants and animals was one of the greatest steps forward taken by mankind. Although it was first achieved long ago, we still need to know what led to it and how, and even when, it took place. Only when we have this understanding will we be able to appreciate fully the important social and economic consequences of this step. Even more important, an understanding of this achievement is basic to any insight into modern man's relationship to his habitat. In the last decade or two a change in methods of investigating these events has taken place, due to the mutual realization by archaeologists and natural scientists that each held part of the key and neither alone had the whole. Inevitably, perhaps, the floodgate that was opened has resulted in a spate of new knowledge, which is scattered in the form of specialist reports in diverse journals. This volume results from presentations at the Institute of Archaeology, London University, discussing the domestication and exploitation of plants and animals. Workers in the archaeological, anthropological, and biological fields attempted to bridge the gap between their respective disciplines through personal contact and discussion. Modern techniques and the result of their application to the classical problems of domestication, selection, and spread of cereals and of cattle were discussed, but so were comparable problems in plants and animals not previously considered in this context. Although there were differing opinions on taxonomic classification, the editors have standardized and simplified the usage throughout this book. In particular, they have omitted references to authorities and adopted the binomial classification for both botanical and zoological names. They followed this procedure in all cases except where sub-specific differences are discussed and also standardized orthography of sites.
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About the Author

Peter J. Ucko is professor emeritus of archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. His research interests include the history of archaeology, prehistoric art and images, and interpretation of archaeological collections and site displays. G. W. Dimbleby (1917-2000) was Chair of Human Environment at the Institute of Archaeology, London University. He was the founding editor of the Journal of Archeological Science. Throughout his life he served on important committees such as Science-based Archaeology Committee of the Science Research Council and the Committee for Rescue Archaeology of the Ancient Monuments Board of England.

Reviews

-This is an extraordinarily heterogeneous volume of papers read to a research seminar in archaeology and related subjects held at the Institute of Archaeology of London University. . . . [I]t should be consulted by all those interested in the history of vegetation and land use.- --A. D. Q. Agnew, Journal of Ecology -One theme of the merit of an ecological approach to archaeology runs through all the papers. This must be welcome to all ecologists. . . those interested in the inter-relationship between man and organisms would undoubtedly benefit from this work. . . . It is. . . a book to recommend to your librarian.- --M. D. Hooper, Journal of Applied Ecology -The overall aspect of the book is pleasing: it is a handsome production quite in keeping with the standards that The Aldine Publishing Company has maintained. . . . I applaud the efforts of the editors and publishers in placing this interesting compilation on the market.- --Ellis L. Yochelson, Systematic Zoology -This book will go far towards showing the historian his limitations in technical knowledge and towards showing the biologist his limitations in the field of historical methods.- --H. J. Hine, Man -[T]his volume will remain an important signpost along the winding track towards an understanding of one of the most decisive, revolutionary episodes in man's long development.- --Robert McC. Adams, The Economic History Review -This is an important group of papers concerning problems surrounding the study of the development of a controlled food supply.- --Robert H. Dyson, Jr., American Anthropologist -This is the best compilation available on the many ways to study the domestication, use, and evolution of plants and animals. . . . It is a valuable reference work, but almost any chapter will make a casual reader view the diverse products in his supermarket with new interest.- --Hugh C. Cutler, American Scientist -I would recommend the book to any one interested in the fields of paleobotany, paleozoology, and paleoanthropology for it contains a wealth of concrete information.- --James L. Phillips, Ecology -This handsome volume of 51 short papers is the fruit of the Research Seminar in Archaeology and Related Subjects held on May 18 and 19, 1968, at the Institute of Archaeology, London University, to promote interdisciplinary contact between workers in archaeology, anthropology and biology.- --Francis D. Hole, The Quarterly Review of Biology "This is an extraordinarily heterogeneous volume of papers read to a research seminar in archaeology and related subjects held at the Institute of Archaeology of London University. . . . [I]t should be consulted by all those interested in the history of vegetation and land use." --A. D. Q. Agnew, Journal of Ecology "One theme of the merit of an ecological approach to archaeology runs through all the papers. This must be welcome to all ecologists. . . those interested in the inter-relationship between man and organisms would undoubtedly benefit from this work. . . . It is. . . a book to recommend to your librarian." --M. D. Hooper, Journal of Applied Ecology "The overall aspect of the book is pleasing: it is a handsome production quite in keeping with the standards that The Aldine Publishing Company has maintained. . . . I applaud the efforts of the editors and publishers in placing this interesting compilation on the market." --Ellis L. Yochelson, Systematic Zoology "This book will go far towards showing the historian his limitations in technical knowledge and towards showing the biologist his limitations in the field of historical methods." --H. J. Hine, Man "[T]his volume will remain an important signpost along the winding track towards an understanding of one of the most decisive, revolutionary episodes in man's long development." --Robert McC. Adams, The Economic History Review "This is an important group of papers concerning problems surrounding the study of the development of a controlled food supply." --Robert H. Dyson, Jr., American Anthropologist "This is the best compilation available on the many ways to study the domestication, use, and evolution of plants and animals. . . . It is a valuable reference work, but almost any chapter will make a casual reader view the diverse products in his supermarket with new interest." --Hugh C. Cutler, American Scientist "I would recommend the book to any one interested in the fields of paleobotany, paleozoology, and paleoanthropology for it contains a wealth of concrete information." --James L. Phillips, Ecology "This handsome volume of 51 short papers is the fruit of the Research Seminar in Archaeology and Related Subjects held on May 18 and 19, 1968, at the Institute of Archaeology, London University, to promote interdisciplinary contact between workers in archaeology, anthropology and biology." --Francis D. Hole, The Quarterly Review of Biology "This is an extraordinarily heterogeneous volume of papers read to a research seminar in archaeology and related subjects held at the Institute of Archaeology of London University. . . . [I]t should be consulted by all those interested in the history of vegetation and land use." --A. D. Q. Agnew, Journal of Ecology "One theme of the merit of an ecological approach to archaeology runs through all the papers. This must be welcome to all ecologists. . . those interested in the inter-relationship between man and organisms would undoubtedly benefit from this work. . . . It is. . . a book to recommend to your librarian." --M. D. Hooper, Journal of Applied Ecology "The overall aspect of the book is pleasing: it is a handsome production quite in keeping with the standards that The Aldine Publishing Company has maintained. . . . I applaud the efforts of the editors and publishers in placing this interesting compilation on the market." --Ellis L. Yochelson, Systematic Zoology "This book will go far towards showing the historian his limitations in technical knowledge and towards showing the biologist his limitations in the field of historical methods." --H. J. Hine, Man "[T]his volume will remain an important signpost along the winding track towards an understanding of one of the most decisive, revolutionary episodes in man's long development." --Robert McC. Adams, The Economic History Review "This is an important group of papers concerning problems surrounding the study of the development of a controlled food supply." --Robert H. Dyson, Jr., American Anthropologist "This is the best compilation available on the many ways to study the domestication, use, and evolution of plants and animals. . . . It is a valuable reference work, but almost any chapter will make a casual reader view the diverse products in his supermarket with new interest." --Hugh C. Cutler, American Scientist "I would recommend the book to any one interested in the fields of paleobotany, paleozoology, and paleoanthropology for it contains a wealth of concrete information." --James L. Phillips, Ecology "This handsome volume of 51 short papers is the fruit of the Research Seminar in Archaeology and Related Subjects held on May 18 and 19, 1968, at the Institute of Archaeology, London University, to promote interdisciplinary contact between workers in archaeology, anthropology and biology." --Francis D. Hole, The Quarterly Review of Biology

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